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Malta: a Great Place to Work

Malta is one of the most spectacular locations to work: glorious Mediterranean climate, a magical mix of professionals from all over the world and an unlimited number of exciting opportunities. If you are considering a career move, think Malta. The country has a thriving economy, where you can enjoy an exceptional lifestyle and build a rewarding career.

Welcome to Malta

As a small nation, Malta has always been very outward looking and welcoming to people and ideas from around the world. The island today is very multi-cultural; with nearly 43,000 expats working here. From tech to finance and from healthcare to tourism – Malta offers foreign professionals more than an international work experience but a place to start and grow their career. 

 

The hottest sectors 

To keep up with its record-breaking economic growth, as well as to account for foreigners returning home, Malta is looking to attract more than 10,000 people per year to join its workforce. Although the island has already become a destination of choice for foreign talent, some skills remain high in demand and short in supply. The fastest-growing sectors in the economy at the moment are blockchain, gaming, financial services, maritime, aviation, life sciences and tourism, but there are also opportunities in healthcare, manufacturing, construction and beyond.

 

  

Making the move

Malta is one of the easiest places to relocate to in the EU and residents enjoy an exceptional standard of living: 10 months of sunshine, an English-speaking population, and a Mediterranean island setting in which it is easy to find one’s way around.  

Although Malta is a small country, it offers a variety of lifestyle choices that range from urban, cosmopolitan and luxurious to relaxed and rural. Boasting a diverse range of shopping, cultural and leisure activities, all at affordable rates, Malta provides expatriates with a unique opportunity to live every aspect of life to the full.

 

Work-life balance

Although working hours do not vary significantly from those in other countries, many expats say that they enjoy a better work-life balance on the island. Malta is one of the few places in the world where you can truly have it all: eight hours of work, eight hours of play and eight hours of sleep. Malta’s small size means beaches, sports facilities and restaurants are just a short ride away.  In a tight labour market, many CEOs also understand that flexible work schedules are one of the top reasons why people enjoy working from Malta.

 Bugibba perched beach


Big & Boutique 

Although Malta is a small country, many expats say that there is more to Malta than meets the eye. The island offers a surprisingly wide choice of job opportunities and interesting career prospects. Malta is home to a kaleidoscope of companies, ranging from Fortune 500 companies to Blockchain startups. 

 

Scale of opportunities

The island’s diversified economy is performing exceptionally well. Malta is not only a place for high-flying professionals in gaming and finance, the country is putting the call out to fill positions for different skill levels in every sector of the economy. Hardly anyone will struggle to find work.

 

Island fever, island life

Honestly, it’s hard to get bored. The sea is never more than 20 minutes from wherever you live in Malta. However, if you need a change of scenery from time to time, Malta International Airport is one of the best connected airports in Europe.

 

Meet the locals 

The majority of expats finds it easy to meet new people in Malta; and many count locals, as well as other expats among their friends. With English as an official language, communication is no barrier, and especially in the smaller towns and villages, locals will be ready to go out of their way to help newcomers in any way they can so that they quickly feel at home.

 

Family time

As in many southern European countries, family plays an important role in Maltese society.  This also means that time-off during evenings and weekends is respected, with many expats citing that they are able to spend more quality time with friends and family.

 

Schools and childcare

Malta provides an excellent standard of education. Children can be educated in one of the private international schools, or enrolled in the local state, church or independent schools.  All schools use the British model of education, which is compulsory between the ages of five and 16. If both parents are working, childcare services are free. Kindergarten is not compulsory in Malta, but English-speaking kindergarten and pre-school facilities are widely  available.

 

Cutting through bureaucracy

EU nationals can work in Malta without an employment licence. The island has also eased the way for non-EU nationals wanting to take up positions in Malta. Companies are today allowed to recruit for a whole range of positions with no quotas or limits, smoothing the path for applicants from third countries. A fast-track visa approval service for non-EU nationals filling key positions has also been launched, while Jobsplus, the country’s public employment service agency, is working to process work permits for third-country nationals as efficiently as possible.

 

 Hard Rock Cafe, Paceville


Nightlife

Malta is dotted with cocktail lounges, rooftop bars and nightclubs, with St. Julian’s, Sliema and Bugibba being the entertainment hubs. Malta’s capital city, Valletta, home to a number of trendy bars, is a stylish alternative to St. Julian’s and attracts a crowd, which is decidedly more upmarket than in the prime entertainment hubs.

  

Taxation 

Malta has a progressive taxation system, under which individuals are taxed between 15 to 35% of their income. Highly qualified foreign professionals working in sectors such as finance, gaming and aviation can also benefit from a flat 15% tax rate on employment income. 

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